After Mid-Terms, Looks Like More of the Same in Gun Politics

Well, it turns out that the promised "Red Wave" tsunami of Republican candidates sweeping to office in this month's mid-term election cycle ran out of steam just shortly past the high tide mark, so expect the next two years to continue to roll on in a dysfunctional fashion.
Michael Crites

Share

Disclosure: Products are selected by our editors. We may earn a commission on purchases from a link. How we select gear.

Well, it turns out that the promised “Red Wave” tsunami of Republican candidates sweeping to office in this month’s mid-term election cycle ran out of steam just shortly past the high tide mark.

As the smoke clears a week later, the tabulations across the country leave the U.S. House in the likely very narrow (like 222 seat majority when 218 are needed to control) possession of the Republicans while the U.S. Senate, which had been very narrowly Democrat-controlled under a 50/50 power-sharing arrangement with the Republicans, will continue that way. In the end, it looks like a divided Congress along very narrow lines, which gives those lawmakers willing to cross party lines a lot of control.

With gun control usually partisan except for when it isn’t, you can expect the next two years to continue to roll on in a dysfunctional fashion– at least until 2024.

4.2/5 - (11 votes)

What do you think?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Checking our work.

We use years of experience, deep research, and hands-on testing to scrutinize our product recommendations and provide you with as close to objectively accurate results we humans can muster. If you’ve found different results in your own testing, think we missed something important, or otherwise need to adjust our work, please let us know. If it’s noteworthy we’ll consider integrating your feedback into our article. After all, it takes a village. 

Email the editor

Read more gun & gear reviews: