Aviator Arms X-1 Bi-Axial Recoil Device thing

News Brief – 10/25

Michael Crites

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In this week’s gun news, Who is Aviator Arms? Beretta goes bolt-gun, Mossberg has a few new tricks, Springfield Armory goes Hi-Power.

Aviator Arms X-1

Aviator Arms X-1 Bi-Axial Recoil Device thing

An outfit in Ohio has a… different…take on replacing the buffer system on an AR-15 style handgun with their X-1 recoil device.

Designed to build a smaller, more compact AR blaster, the X-1 deletes the buffer tube, buffer, and recoil spring from the back of the lower receiver and relocates them in a more compact form to the top of the upper receiver.

It looks weird in operation but can really make a gun shorter.

The brown lining? It costs $400 and is still so new that it feels like a Kickstarter.

Beretta BRX1

Beretta’s Italian-based HQ this week announced what they are calling the company’s first bolt-action hunting rifle, the BRX1. Modular– it can swap barrels and caliber on the fly at the user-lever– the new rifle looks futuristic.

Meanwhile, Berettas contends it is faster, more instinctive, and easier-to-shoot thanks to its linear reloading system (i.e., a straight-pull bolt system similar to the Swiss K. 31 rifle) coupled with superb ergonomics and balance.

In case you weren’t already curious, the bolt system mimics that of an AR-10/AR-15, can be swapped from right to left for southpaws, and benefits from an adjustable trigger weight.

Downside? It looks like it will run somewhere over $1,800 and is only available in Europe, at least for now.

New Mossberg MC2Sc & 590S

Mossberg MC2sc

Mossberg has both a new handgun and shotgun series inbound with their MC2Sc micro-compact pistol and 590S line of min-shell-firing scattergatts.

The company introduced their MC1 series 9mm handguns a couple of years ago to a comparative shrug from the marketplace but the new MC2Sc goes smaller while offering an 11+1 or 14+1 capacity, and an optics-ready slide allows easy direct mounting of Micro Dot optics.

Priced between $556 and $662 depending on night sight options, they aren’t going to beat anybody else’s Micro 9s in the pocketbook, which means they have an uphill climb. Still, nice to see Mossy trying to break out of the box.

Meanwhile, the all-new 590S line– which includes two full-length shotguns and two Shockwave style NFA-compliant shorty “firearms”– can run any combination of 1.75-, 2.75- or 3-inch 12 gauge shells.

The new ability to cycle mini-shells without any modifications comes via a redesigned elevator and bolt slide, as well as an addition of an energy-absorbing bumper. For example, the 20-inch barrel model can hold 13+1 mini-shells, 8+1 standard 2.75s, or 7+1 3-inch magnums. MSRP ranges from $623 to $731.

Springfield Armory Goes Hi-Power

SA Hi-Power

When FN (Browning) halted production of their famed Hi-Power pistol in 2017 after a run that covered something like 80 years, prices on the suddenly even more collectible 13+1 round 9mm combat pistols went into overdrive.

While cloners were out there in places like Bulgaria and Turkey making knock-offs, there just aren’t any nice wood-and-steel versions around anymore, at least without finding a stimmy check in the mail or $1K in the couch cushions. To give the boomers (and fans of Call of Duty) what they want, Springfield Armory has come to the rescue with a new version of the old-school Browning, the SA-35.

With a matte finish and some improvements (no magazine cut off, a 15+1 round flush fit mag, upgraded surface controls, and sights) the American-made gun has an asking price of $699, which makes it a little more than the clones from overseas, but probably worth it.

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