Zigana PX-9 G2 Semi-Auto Pistol a

News Brief – 7/28

Michael Crites

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In this week’s gun news Caesar Guerini Invictus M-SPEC, Hi-Point gets wildly different reviews, SDS introduces PX9-G2 pistol, and Team USA grabs an early Gold Medal in shooting event at Tokyo Olympics.

Caesar Guerini M-SPEC

Invictus Sporting M-SPEC 12g

Italian shotgun maker Caesar Guerini introduced their popular Invictus line of over/under shotguns in 2014 and their newest installment, the Invictus I Sporting M-SPEC 12 gauge, is ready for the field with either 32- or 34-inch barrels.

Developed in conjunction with renowned trap shooter Richard Fauld, the M-SPEC is designed to methodically chew through sporting clays in style, while still looking good doing it, showing up with a deluxe walnut stock that carries a conventional style comb and asymmetrical pistol grip with palm swell.

Designed to be durable enough to keep running after cycling a million shells, contends Caesar Guerini, Invictus M-SPEC still has a beautiful deep-blued finish on all metal surfaces and subtle gold accents.

MSRP is $7,775, as you would expect.

On the Hi-Point Carbine

In the same week, two wildly different takes on Hi-Points M995 carbine– a distinctive 9mm PCC often compared to the rifles used in the old (pre-Marky Mark) Planet of the Apes franchise— went live.

Over at GunsAmerica, a modded and gold-painted example was somehow used to gain USPSA Grand Master classification in the Steel Challenge PCC division.

On the direct opposite of that, Mike over at the very popular Garand Thumb channel, found a T&E model Hi-Point Carbine to function so poorly that the 21-minute video review  is entitled “The WORST GUN I have ever shot.”

We aren’t even kidding.

Meet the SDS PX9-G2

Zigana PX-9 G2 Semi-Auto Pistol a

Knoxville, Tennessee-based SDS Imports has a sequel to their well-received Tisas Zigana PX9 pistol, a polymer-framed striker-fired 9mm. The second generation gun is the logically designated PX9-G2.

It uses a 9mm hammer-forged barrel and slide come standard with a polymer frame, adjustable sights, and forward slide serrations. Featuring a light rail, ambidextrous safeties, and magazine release, the new PX9-G2 can be customized to fit any shooter with interchangeable side panels and backstraps which allow 27 different grip configurations.

As far as aftermarket support, PX9-G2 uses S&W M&P 2.0-style sight dovetails and Sig P226 magazines.

“We’ve worked closely with Tisas, the manufacturer of the PX9s, to develop the G2 version for the U.S. market, and look forward to continuing this partnership and building on the success of the original PX9,” said SDS executive David Fillers.

The SDS PX9-G2 ships with two 18-round magazines, a cleaning kit, a pretty hokey looking holster that will likely never get used by anyone who has ever seen a real holster, and an owner’s manual in a lockable hard case for an MSRP of $379, a price that will probably be closer to the $299 mark at the end of the day.

Team USA- William Shaner gets Gold

William Shaner, 20, made history as the youngest American to take an Olympic rifle competition, earning the gold medal Sunday in the men’s 10-meter air rifle competition at the Asaka Shooting Range in Tokyo. Shaner, a Colorado resident and mechanical engineering major at the University of Kentucky, posted an Olympic-record score of 251.6 to edge China’s Sheng Lihao.

The medal was Team USA’s first gold medal in the men’s 10-meter event and the country’s 54th Olympic gold medal in shooting events since 1896.

Shaner is having a great year, last month – winning the gold at the ISSF World Cup in Croatia in men’s 10m air rifle event.

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