News Brief – 12/20

Michael R Crites

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In this week’s gun news, the gun industry hits back against New York, first Ruger Marlin surfaces in the wild, Savage goes bolt-action pistol, meet the SiCo Harvester EVO, Springfield operates 1911 style.

NSSF et, al vs Letitia James

The National Shooting Sports Foundation and a group of 14 firearm manufacturers, distributors, and retailers– including Beretta, Glock, Ruger, and S&W– filed a federal lawsuit last week and moved for a preliminary injunction of a New York law “designed to blame the industry for the criminal misuse or unlawful possession of firearms in New York no matter where they were purchased.”

The NSSF and gun makers argue New York’s new “public nuisance” law would subject members of the firearm industry to civil lawsuits for the criminal misuse or unlawful possession of firearms in New York, something akin to suing the maker of an automobile if a drunk driver uses it to kill someone.

Gun control groups say the argument is off base, likely because they are gun control groups, and New York’s admittedly anti-gun AG, Letitia James, says (basically) “come at me, bro.” It is almost as if James was looking to take this to court all along…

Ruger's Marlin 1895 SBL

As we’ve covered before, Ruger now owns Marlin Firearms and has promised to bring out the 1895 Stainless Big Loop (SBL) to market. Well, it appears that Outdoor Life has the scoop on it, which tracks as the rifle’s demographics would be fans of print sportsman’s magazines. The long and short of it is the gun seems legit but has a bunch of subtle Ruger shoutouts, so you won’t dare confuse it as a Remington product.

Via Outdoor Life’s John Snow:

“While Marlin will continue to exist as a stand-alone entity, there’s no doubt that Ruger has put its mark on the rifle. Visually, you see this in several places. There’s the prominent “Marlin • Mayodan, NC • USA” along the barrel; Mayodan is the factory site where Ruger makes its AR rifles and other firearms. The serial numbers start with RM, for “Ruger Made,” though they could also stand for “Revived Marlin.” The proof mark on the barrel has an “R” in it. Also, the trademark Marlin bullseye on the underside of the stock is Ruger red, though Marlin history buffs know that red was the original Marlin color, so actually, this is a return to the company’s roots.”

Savage 110 PCS

110-pcs-pistol-chasis-handgun-lifestyle-1

Savage has upcycled their 110-series bolt action rifle into what they call the Pistol Chassis System. The Savage 110 PCS has a 10.5-inch barrel and is offered in .223 Rem, 6.5 Creedmoor, .300 Blackout, .308 Win, and .350 Legend.

The forend has M-LOK slots and a bipod/sling stud while there is an MOA top rail and a rear Pic rail with sling QDs. The asking price is $1K.

SiCo Harvester

SilencerCo Harvester

SilencerCo, who is kind of the Glock of the suppressor world, has a new can that costs less than $1K, which is rare for SiCo. The Harvester EVO is tubeless and is rated for everything from .22 Hornet to .300 Win for $680.

About the size of a Red Bull can, it is pitched as perfect for those packing mountain guns into the backcountry, you know the kind of guys that watch every ounce. Keep in mind that hunting with suppressors is legal in 40 states.

Springfield 1911 Operator

Springfield Armory Operator 1911

“For those that demand a no-nonsense approach to their defensive grade pistol,” Springfield Armory has (yet another) M1911, the Operator.

We jest in the snark, but the gun does look nice and includes lots of standard features including a forged frame and slide, forged match-grade barrel, a low-key black Cerakote finish, Tactical Rack rear/tritium front sights, G10 grips, an ambi safety, two eight-round magazines with bumper pads, forward cocking serrations, and, oh year, an M1913 accessory rail.

Caliber is .45 ACP only. The price is $1,099.

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